Books read, July to September 2016

Posted on September 27, 2016 under Books

books-july-to-september

Last time around I was hoping to beat that quarter’s total of four books read, and I did that quite handily. I read four by the end of August and a total of eight between July and September. I’m now only four books away from my 2016 goal of 25. I have six books in my to-read pile, so I’m hoping to get through at least that by 2017! Here’s what I read this quarter…

Half of a Yellow Sun by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Ahh, I love Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s writing and admire her so greatly as a person. Americanah was one of my favourites of 2015, and Half of a Yellow Sun promises to be at the top of my 2016 list. It’s about Biafra’s attempt to create an independent republic in Nigeria in the 1960s and the effects of the tumult on the lives of five main characters. Adichie’s writing is gorgeous, her characters unbelievably well-drawn, and the tension tangible. I’m absolutely going to be picking up Purple Hibiscus, her first novel, because I’ve heard it’s wonderful as well.

We Were Feminists Once by Andi Zeisler

I didn’t even know this book existed until I was poking around my favourite local independent bookstore and saw it. “That looks good!” I said to my mom. I read the blurb and then said, “I’m going to buy it.” It’s about the commodification and depoliticization of feminism that has come as a direct result of the popularization of the movement, a topic which I am very interested in. I thought it was very well-written and engaging, with timely pop culture examples that I’d expect of the co-founder of Bitch magazine. I really wish it had taken a more focused Marxist approach (I mean, the topic is begging for it, really), but if anyone is interested in an intelligent critique of modern feminism from a self-identified feminist I’d totally recommend this.

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by JK Rowling, John Tiffany, and Jack Thorne

It’s funny to me that nine years ago when Deathly Hallows came out we were all begging JKR for more, and now that she is giving us more, we’re all begging her to stop. The Cursed Child was okay, to me. Good for what it is, even. Maybe I’m being generous because I imagine that it would be spectacular to see, though reading the script is admittedly less so. The actual mechanisms and structure of the plot are clever and certainly smack of JKR’s involvement.

However, the plot itself seems a bit silly to me: it’s essentially a nostalgia tour, as Harry’s youngest son revisits several seminal moments from the original series and then we explore how the entire wizarding world would be changed forever if the events had not happened in the same way. This makes me question who the play is for. Surely not for devoted fans, as there’s not much new? But it relies so heavily on the established Harry Potter mythology that I can’t see it attracting a new generation of fans, either. I thought the dialogue was bad and some of the characterization was off. I’m sorry, I’ve read the original series four million times, I will never accept that Ron was drunk during his wedding vows, however flawed he may be! That said, I did like the character of Scorpius, and Albus’s character growth was nice.

I don’t think this is necessarily bad, I just don’t really get why it exists. And I think it might be time to retire Harry Potter. I say that as someone who has been an aggressive HP fan since 2000.

The Little Friend by Donna Tartt

I wanted to pick up The Secret History since it’s very widely talked about and I liked The Goldfinch, but Chapters didn’t have it so I settled for Tartt’s second novel, which is mostly not talked about.

Now, if you’re like me and you read the summary on the back of the book and think, “Cool! A mystery about a murdered little boy set in the South! This sounds like literary Gillian Flynn!”, then you will be disappointed. Because the book is not really about Robin Cleve Dufresnes’s murder, and you will probably get to page 400 or so and think, “So, I’m definitely not going to find out who killed him.” Which, I think, would be fine had the blurb not very much made it seem like it was a regular murder mystery.

No. It is not. It is a book that is peripherally about his murder and more directly about his formerly well-to-do, dysfunctional but loving Southern family. The “main” plot – that is, his twelve-year-old sister Harriet’s investigation into his murder – frequently gives way to classic Donna Tartt meandering. Very well-written meandering, but meandering all the same. Which, I think, is fine, because that’s what this book is. It is not a quick, snappy murder mystery with a twist ending. It’s a long, descriptive portrait of a family shaken by a death that they are too repressed to acknowledge healthily. I found it enjoyable when I viewed it that way and let go of the feeling that I had been bait and switched. That said – and I didn’t feel this way about The Goldfinch – I do think this book could have benefited from a bit of editing.

The Secret History by Donna Tartt

I finished The Little Friend and immediately found The Secret History at aforementioned local independent bookstore, who never lets me down. Having read all three of Tartt’s novels within the past few months, I think I can pretty fairly say that this one was my favourite, although I enjoyed all three with some fairly minor reservations. The Secret History is by no means a quick-paced thriller (I mean, it’s 560 pages long), but it replicates a lot of the psychological effects of a thriller and is a lot more compulsively readable than her other two novels. However, anyone who already knows they don’t like Tartt’s writing style (that is, very descriptive, prone to wandering, potentially 100 pages longer than strictly necessary) will probably have the same issues with this one. Personally those things don’t bother me greatly with her books specifically, so I really liked The Secret History, its dark psychology, and its inversion of the “whodunnit” question into “whydtheydoit” and “willtheygetcaught”.

Women in Clothes by Sheila Heti, Heidi Julavits, and Leanne Shapton

I liked this a lot, with some reservations. Definitely fascinating and unique in concept if imperfect in execution.

Ways of Seeing by John Berger

This book is a series of essays about the semiotics of images. Four of the essays are text- and image-based and three use images only. Despite the fact that it was published in 1972, it didn’t feel dated to me at all, nor did it feel too academic to be accessible. I read it quickly and easily. Most of the arguments were not particularly innovative or nuanced, but they were all very well-articulated in clear language. My favourite essay, probably not surprisingly, was the third overall (and second text essay), about how women in art are positioned as the surveyed while men are the surveyors. Like I said, not exactly a unique argument, but interesting nonetheless. I also liked the essay on oil paintings as a symbol of capitalist acquisition and the one about how advertisements hail their viewers. This is pretty easy reading for what it is, but I’d only recommend it to someone who already has an interest or background in semiotics since it’s not exactly consumer non-fiction.

The Wonder by Emma Donaghue

I loved Room when I read it back in 2011 and liked Hood okay. The concept for The Wonder – an eleven-year-old girl in 1850s Ireland who has apparently survived not eating a bite in four months – intrigued me, so I bought it right away and tore through it in one sitting. I absolutely loved it. There isn’t much action for a lot of the book, but the psychological component kept me turning the pages. The story is told from the perspective of Lib Wright, a nurse hired by a committee of townspeople to keep watch over Anna O’Donnell to determine whether she is a fraud, and I loved her character. She was very no-nonsense on the surface but deeply empathetic and a fiercely moral person. And as the book careens towards it conclusion, it truly felt high-stakes, both in terms of the plot and human emotion. A fascinating look at religious fanaticism, the deadly effects of sexism, and how inaction can be akin to complicity. I can’t think of a single thing I’d change about it.

P.S. The Wonder is not included in the picture because I’ve lent it to my mom. I know you were all dying to know…

Book Review: Women in Clothes

Posted on September 10, 2016 under Books

women-in-clothes-cover

I first heard about Women in Clothes, a compilation text with a whopping 642 contributors, when it released in the fall of 2014. I was immediately interested in it; as I’ve established on my blog, I’m very interested in exploring the importance of everyday things in people’s lives, especially if they’re considered banal. But the price tag put me off it, as did the fact that I was living in Scotland at the time and didn’t want a 500-page book to transport back to Canada in the spring.

This past fall, I mentioned to my mom that I was interested in the book. I was truly surprised to find it under the Christmas tree! For years I’ve just told my parents what I want for Christmas and am not surprised, but my mom usually manages to sneak something in. I was delighted by this surprise, and, of course, promptly let the book sit on my shelf for nine months. (It’s big, I was in school, you know the drill.)

women-in-clothes1

I finally got around to reading it and I finally have some thoughts to share! Firstly, it’s undeniably a beautiful book. I love the cover design, the thick paper, the typography, and the visual components. It’s truly an aesthetically-pleasing book, which makes sense given its subject matter.

women-in-clothes2

I was expecting the book to essentially to be a whole lot of surveys, one after the other. And while the survey questions the authors concocted made up the meat of the book, its form is actually much more haphazard than that. For example, opening it up randomly to page 120, I find a visual component, followed by a personal essay (“What I Wore To Fall in Love”), a mini compilation of quick responses to a single survey question, another visual component, an interview between a woman and her adult son… and so on. The book also contains poems, one-off visual projects (such as a series of photographs of six women wearing each other’s signature outfits), and charts. This structure really worked for me, as it kept the book fresh, always interesting, and very readable. I’d expected to read a few pages of this in between other books, finishing it over the course of a month or so, but I read it all in two days.

women-in-clothes3

I liked that there were women of different cultural backgrounds and ages surveyed. There were immigrant (or first generation American/Canadian) stories and even a few features on garment factory workers. There were a few trans women featured, a fashion designer, a woman who wears the same dress every day. The book is fairly geocentric; the authors are from New York and Toronto, and obviously they recruited from within their circles, so the Northeastern US and Montreal/Toronto demographics are arguably over-represented. There were a few women interviewed who live in other countries (Poland, Egypt), but most were North American. Many of the survey respondents were also writers or other creative-types. I understand this, on the one hand – it’s easy to believe that creatives are more likely to care about self-presentation, and the writers had very lucid and lovely words about their clothes and styles. But I can’t help but think that it would have been more fascinating to have a bit more representation from the everyday woman to complement the very unusual women who were featured. (And, yes, it did seem like the women skewed upper middle class at least; designer brands were name-dropped quite frequently.)

women-in-clothes5

I will say that although there were a fair amount of cultural backgrounds represented, the book did skew quite white overall. Sometimes it was a bit tone-deaf. A Guardian review points out that “there is an entire section about what women say when they get their hair braided, featuring nine photographs of white women in various stages of hair-braided repose. This might have been a good place to include a woman from a different race – say, a black woman, for whom a relationship with braided hair is deeply intrinsic, and actually interesting.”

(Also, not related to race, but Lena Dunham saying that she likes to dress as a “new lesbian” made me roll my eyes, but everything Lena Dunham does has that effect on me, so.)

women-in-clothes4

Although I’d say that the book had a fairly Western liberal feminist perspective overall, I appreciate the inclusion of “outsider” voices. One of my favourite pieces was “I Do Care About Your Party” by Umm Adam, a Muslim woman who argues that “We don’t need to do anything to our body to make it look beautiful.” I don’t fully agree with her entire essay, but it’s a thought-provoking piece, especially her conclusion that “I feel a sense of freedom that I do not have that burden on me, of making myself attractive to others all the time.”

women-in-clothes6

This is not necessarily a book for someone looking to develop a sense of style, although you may find inspiration in how others approach getting dressed. More than anything, it’s an almost sociological text (though definitely not at an academic level, obviously). And I just really appreciate intelligent, thoughtful approaches to “women’s interest”-type things, that treat them as worthy of investigation and conversation. Women’s appearances are such a fraught area, and I like that there are texts coming out that approach this topic compassionately and intelligently. As I said, I do think that this is a pretty liberal feminist perspective (in that most of the women spoke of clothes in terms of empowerment and personal identity, and there was very little time spent on the disempowerment of women through emphasizing and policing appearance), but I really like how eloquently a “frivolous” topic was presented. It made me think about my own (practically nonexistent) style and how I’d answer some of the survey questions, which I liked.

women-in-clothes7

Some of the pieces are better than others. Some of this is just personal preference: not everything will speak to everyone, and that’s why it’s cool that so many women were featured. Some of the pieces seemed only marginally related to fashion (“What I Wore To Fall In Love”, mentioned earlier, is, not shockingly, more of a romantic story than one about clothes.)

women-in-clothes8

Some of my favourite features:

  • Mothers as Others, in which women present photos of their mothers from before they had children and talk about their lives and styles.
  • Maybe A Lot Of People Don’t Do This, an essay by Ly Ky Tran, whose Vietnamese immigrant family created clothing out of their NYC apartment for low wages.
  • A Map Of My Floor, in which the authors map out clothing items they’ve tried on and discarded for a specific event.
  • The Surfer Is Nothing Without The Wave, an interview with an art historian which is one of the most cerebral pieces in the book. It veers on pretentious, but I can’t help but love the phrase “May I quote Gilles Deleuze, pretentiously?” and wish that my peers in my film classes had asked that before quoting Deleuze, pretentiously and usually irrelevantly.
  • The Pink Purse, an essay by Emily Gould. She recounts saving up to buy a pink Marc Jacobs purse, which she donated six years later because it was impractical and hadn’t held up well. It’s a story of excitement followed by buyer’s remorse which I think anyone can relate to – though luckily the objects of my remorse have never been quite so expensive.
  • Clothes on the Ground, a series of fascinating profiles of garment workers in Cambodia, their working conditions, and the clothing they buy and wear.
  • This Person Is A Robot, in which one of the authors goes with a scent scientist to a coat check in New York and smell people’s coats. It’s funny and silly and a good representation of the weird one-off features that I like in this book.
  • What I Spent, a six-month diary of what a magazine employee spent on clothes (including many returns and regrets). It’s actually quite interesting and well-written.
  • Put On A Tux And Go, a feature on dance costumes and how they’re chosen.
  • A French Girl Hoeing, an interview with a farmer who’s interested in fashion. Unexpected and totally fascinating!

women-in-clothes10

I think this is one of those books that either appeals or doesn’t appeal to each individual. I’ve read some negative reviews of it and I understand why people wouldn’t like it. Some of the pieces are not that interesting or compelling and some approach or fully descend into pretentious navel-gazing territory. But the overall mission and impact of the book is one that certainly appeals to me.

Summer 2016 Favourites

Posted on August 29, 2016 under Favourites

summer2016-favs-header

It’s almost September, and that kind of means nothing to me. For the first time since I can remember, I’m not going back to school this week. I’m actually pretty bummed about it, but this time next year I will either be gearing up to move to Scotland or recently arrived, so I guess it’ll all be okay in the end.

Technically summer is not actually over for another few weeks, but I can’t help but see the end of August as the end of the season, since I’ve always started school in early September. So this seemed like an appropriate time to share with you my summer beauty favourites.

Face

summer-favs-face

I believe I’ve mentioned in passing a few times my love for Revlon Nearly Naked foundation. It had light-to-medium coverage, a lightweight consistency, and a really great natural finish. I much preferred it to its thick, full coverage cousin Revlon ColorStay. I was devastated when NN was discontinued. The much-hyped MUFE Ultra HD reminds me a lot Nearly Naked. It has pretty good coverage but still looks natural; it’s lightweight and watery compared to foundations like, say, Rimmel Lasting Finish, and I like how it looks on my skin.

The real winner, though, is the combination of MUFE Ultra HD and the Real Techniques Stippling Brush. I had one I liked using to apply pigmented blushes, and decided to get another one for foundation. I’ve spent the last year applying foundation with my fingers, and before that was a devout knockoff Beauty Blender user. But I love the way this brush applies this particular foundation. It doesn’t go on too thick, and it’s super easy and quick to blend it all out with stippling motions. I do like this foundation with the RT Buffing Brush too, but there’s just something about the finish I get with the Stippling Brush that I truly love.

glossier-haloscope

I recently won the Glossier Haloscape in Quartz in Renee‘s giveaway. I was pretty jazzed about this because a) winning things is nice, and b) Glossier doesn’t ship to Canada (yet). Like many others, I’m not a massive fan of Glossier’s cool-girl branding, but I have been curious about some of the products thanks to all the hype. I’m not sure if there’s anything else I’d purchase myself if and when they do open up their international shipping, but I’m so glad I have the Haloscope.

I spent August 5 to 21 in front of my television whenever I wasn’t sleeping or working. I’m really serious about the Olympics. I actually packed a makeup bag full of stuff to keep in my living room so that I could get ready for work without leaving the television. As such, I used the Haloscape every day that I put on makeup. This is the product that has made me realize that cream is my favourite format for highlighter. It’s just so easy to swipe on (straight from the tube) and blend out with a few taps. And, I mean, the glow is real:

haloscope-quartz-on-face

So real that I just assumed it would distract you from that zit, and declined to photoshop it out.

Highlighter is one of those options that I could take or leave, so I love having a product that is easy to apply, requires no brushes, and makes a huge impact.

Eyes

kvd-shade-and-light-eyes

I will admit that I’m not a huge fan of Kat Von D the human. (Although, let’s be real, her video about Jeffree Star was incredibly satisfying to watch.) And if the UD Naked Ultimate Basics had been announced six weeks later, I would have bought that. But instead I bought the Kat Von D Shade & Light Eye Contour Palette, because lately I’ve been very into mattes for the first time in my life, and I don’t regret it for a second. These eyeshadows are every bit as high quality as everyone says, and I love all the colours on my skintone. The middle of those larger pans is the perfect subtle contour shade for me. I also love the large pan on the right. That peach shade is great for blending out around the edges. And of course, the deep rusty shade is stunning. I honestly think that between this palette and my LORAC Pro, I could probably be set for neutral eyeshadows. However, I will continue to own many unnecessary palettes because I want to.

nars-callisto

I bought NARS Dual Intensity Eyeshadow in Callisto at the end of May, and I absolutely love it. It’s a silvery pink eyeshadow with the most ridiculous shine. Seriously, you need to see it in motion to understand:

nars-callisto

The whole point of the Dual Intensity shadows is that you can use them wet or dry. I personally have not tried Callisto wet, because I can’t imagine it looking even more amazing than it does dry. One day I will test this thesis. One day I will also use it as a highlighter and probably have my mind blown.

summer-favs-lashes

There’s nothing like a good eyelash curler to make your lashes look amazing, is there? I’m glad I dropped the big bucks on this Tweezerman Classic Lash Curler, because it curls my lashes much more effectively than the cheapy Walmart brand one I’d been using previously. And Clarins Truly Waterproof Mascara has been my go-to. Waterproof mascara isn’t my usual bag, but it’s nice when I’m hot and sweaty, and I adore what it does for my lashes:

clarins-truly-waterproof

I’ve always been into length over volume, and this is probably the best lengthening mascara I’ve ever used. It may have even dethroned the original Lancôme Hypnôse for my favourite absurdly expensive mascara that I would in no way ever spend actual money on. (Truly Waterproof was a gift from a friend.)

Its wand is quite standard, like so:

clarins-truly-waterproof-wand

Lips

summer2016-favs-lipstick

Generally I go for cool lipstick colours because I like them better on myself. But this summer my two favourite lip colours are quite warm. The first is NARS Audacious Lipstick in Brigitte, which is the first peach I’ve ever truly liked on myself. It’s a bit deeper – peaches with white bases are absolute no-gos for me – and has just a hint of brown. It was my go-to neutral colour this summer. I like the formula, too: I didn’t find it overly drying, and it lasted well. I’m not sure that it’s worth $39, but I bought it with Optimum points so I don’t really care anyway. (My one very pedantic criticism is that I always think of Brigitte Bardot with more of a pale nude lip than a deeper warm peach, but I found a lot of pictures of her wearing peach lipstick, so I will eat my words.)

When I wanted a bit more colour, I pulled out an old favourite: Revlon Balm Stain in Romantic, a sheer, warm red. I don’t think they even make this colour anymore. I bought it way back at the beginning of my interest in makeup – at the time I couldn’t have had more than 5 lip colours total. The few times I’ve tried to make opaque warm reds work on myself, I have hated them and given them away. But there’s something about the sheerness and slight shine of Romantic that I really like, and that gets me compliments every time I wear it.

summer2016-favs-lip-swatches

Brigitte is on the left in this picture; Romantic is on the right. They actually look really similar in this swatch; in real life Brigitte is more peach and Romantic is more red. But you can see that I really knew what I liked this summer!

Nails

summer2016-favs-nails

I used to have incredibly strong, thick, unbendable nails. Around two years ago, they started peeling. I’m not sure if this had to do with the fact that I stopped drinking like 75 litres of milk a day around that time, or because I started a job that required using my hands a lot around that time, or something else entirely. Witchcraft Be Strong Protein Hardener is a base coat that has really helped cut the peeling down. As for specific nail colours, I’m loving Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Rosy Outlook, Sally Hansen Xtreme Wear in Pacific Blue (though I’m having to ration it since I only have two bottles left), Sally Hansen Miracle Gel in Sugar Fix, Sally Hansen Complete Salon Manicure in Barracuda, and Barry M Gelly Hi-Shine in Kiwi. These are some of my favourite nail polish colours ever, come to think of it. Also, I really like blue. And Sally Hansen.

Hair

light-blue-shade

Light Blue Shade is the best blonde shampoo I’ve ever tried, and it’s under $10 Canadian. Contrary to its name, it’s actually a deep purple, and it’s incredibly effective at fighting brassiness. Normally my hair will take on some yellow after some time without toner has elapsed, even with a purple shampoo. Here, compare a picture of my hair somewhere between toning cycles using another shampoo with my hair today:

light-blue-shade-results

The last time I did my roots and toned my hair was approximately 5 weeks ago, so we’re halfway through my usual cycle and still this platinum. And that’s using my DIY Manic Panic concoction instead of a more potent developer-based toner. Needless to say, I love this stuff a stupid amount.

And that is it for my summer favourites! I hope you all had a great summer and that if you’re embarking on a new school year it goes well for you.